A true snowmobile destination

There are plenty of trails to choose from around La Ronge

sledders on the trail
Experience the thrill of high-marking and big bowl riding - KPI File Photo
Hotshots Father and son sledding trip

Steve Donaldson captured this pic of his son, Ty, at Mathew Creek riding his 2009 Polaris 700 Dragon.

Ride On! Keith Curtis at the RMSHA. Catching up with the king: Keith Curtis

SnoRiders speaks to the 2014 Jackson Hole World Championship King of Kings winner

Gearboxx Schooled 5 film review

Following the tradition of education and entertainment, the Schooled crew bring it on in their latest flick, Schooled 5.

Brett Rasmussen on his new Ski-Doo XM demonstrates the art of working with your sled’s geometry rather than simply relying on muscle and horsepower. I’ll be honest—I’ve watched his segment at least 24 times at this point. At 54 years old and phenomenal, Rasmussen redefines the way we look at our terrain. Keith Curtis is jaw-dropping awesome with skill and technique that completely tames what was once thought of as unrideable. And Tony Jenkins with his balls-to-the-wall style of riding thrills and brings some humour to the group.  

Published May 2010

Lac La Ronge and area is a snowmobiling paradise. Surrounded by boreal forest, the lakes and rivers meander through the Precambrian Shield to connect and form one of the most spectacular and diverse trail systems in the world.

Snowmobiling in this part of the country is perfectly natural and really quite unique. Bring your helmet and snowmobile licence plate to ride to town. The snowmobile speed limit through La Ronge is 20 kilometres per hour; try to stay to the right side of your traffic lane, obey all other traffic regulations, and don’t be surprised if sleds outnumber cars in the parking lot.

After breakfast, get ready for the ride of your life. A five-minute tour in any direction will reward you with an escape into the peace and tranquillity of the boreal forest in winter. Run flat out across the lake or follow thousands of miles of trappers’ trails that connect communities, traplines, ice fishing holes, historic sites and recreation areas. A favourite local weekend activity is to ride 50 miles across Lac La Ronge, take the portage trail into Iskwatikan Lake and drive across to visit Nistowiak Falls. From the bottom of the falls, follow the Churchill River system to the west, passing the oldest building of its kind in the province—the Anglican Church—and then head for fuel and lunch in Stanley Mission.

From Stanley there are several routes back to La Ronge, but the local snowmobile club marks one trail. Travel the seven miles of portages and small lakes to Russell Bay on the northeast edge of Lac La Ronge, then follow the marked 42-mile trail back to town, and snowmobile right up to the door of your motel room.

Night riding is very popular in the north as well. Daylight hours are short and there are no barbed-wire fences to run into. After supper, try some technical riding on twisty and narrow bush trails, or ride to the south end of the lake where the local club hangs out at the gravel pit. Experience the thrill of high-marking and big bowl riding, or socialize by the fire and roast a marshmallow.

Those riders who are simply in search of deep and undisturbed powder snow will not be disappointed, but bring your map, compass and GPS to keep from getting lost. Lake after lake with endless miles of sheltered bays full of powder will call you miles from the nearest marked trail.

Whether you are looking for family trail rides and fireside activities, scenic snowmobile touring, technical trails and hillclimbing, or adrenalin-rushing, full-throttle lake runs, let La Ronge be your new winter paradise.

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