Dream shredders

The Super Braap Man and the She-Shredding Dream Girl

by Trish Drinkle

Men and women are different. These differences can be accentuated when we choose to braaap together. Here are some thoughts on what would be considered the “dream man” and “dream woman” when it comes to snowmobiling.

The Super Braaap Man:

  • Is happy to ride with his woman. He has patience in her learning and loves the fact that he can share the sport he loves with the girl of his dreams.
     
  • Has a cool head when his woman gets stuck. He doesn’t just begrudgingly un-stick her. Super Braaap Man shows her how to get herself out of a pickle. She may feel down, but Super Braaap Man reminds her that everyone gets stuck.
  • Wears a kidney belt and never complains that his woman is a burden. Yeah, yeah—he may be lifting and pulling more than if he was riding with the dudes but there will be a time when her skill level soars and she will require less un-sticking. 
  • Is proud of accomplishments his she-shredder has. Her climbs, drops or wicked moves become the topic of conversation with others. Nothing is sexier than a man who is proud of his woman.
  • Knows that crap happens—bumpers, A-arms and other components are vulnerable.  If she smashes something, he simply reminds her yet again that stuff happens and he helps to formulate a plan to fix her ride.
  • Never sticks his woman with a sled that isn’t right for her. I seriously don’t care how much money you have invested in your M1000. You want a new ProClimb 8000, and that’s cool but do not pass your ride onto your woman because you can’t get your money out of it upon trade-in or resale. You don’t want it any more, that’s fine, but if it is a machine she will not be able to handle, figure out a way to compromise. She deserves the best within budget, just like you. 
  • Keeps the affection flowing. I simply love the fact that my husband will give me little kisses and hold my hand on the hill. It makes me feel so loved, which gives me the confidence to ride better. It’s a win-win!
  • Surprises his she-shredder with special braaap gifts she most likely would not buy for herself. Mothers tend to spend on their family before even considering spending a dime on themselves. When Super Braaap Man lavishes her with super-technical gear, or powder coats parts of her sled to match her personality, that screams Dream Dude.
  • Protects her. Plain and simple. He helps to keep his woman safe and sound while they spend their day shredding. Strength and wisdom radiate from Super Braaap Man.

The She-Shredding Dream Girl:

  • Always packs her own gear, lunch and safety equipment, never relying on her man to “take care” of her.
  • Helps to fuel and oil up her sled. You are responsible for your own ride, ladies. if you’re riding with your man, look after your own machine.
  • Can use all of her epic domestic talents on the hill. Many a man will envy your husband as sweet smells of roasted potatoes, beef tenderloin and more radiate from his machine.  I know, I know—stereotypes and all that jazz aside, it’s still nice to be a woman.
  • Can manoeuvre her machine like one of the dudes. It may not come at once, but nothing makes a man more proud than a wife who can bust an intricate line in front of all his buddies. One time, I was at the top of a ridge waiting for our group when I started to get impatient waiting. I walked over to where I could see the group of guys on the bottom staring at the climb before them. My husband kept pointing up—long story short he was laughing at their hesitation. His words were, “For God’s sake, my wife is up there! Get going.”
  • Makes every effort to un-stick herself. This isn’t the whole Cinderella, Prince Charming crap on the hill. No one likes a person who gives up on their stuck and waits for others to get them out. It’s simply not cool. No matter if it’s a small stuck, get working girl. You’ll learn inventive ways to un-stick yourself and you most likely will minimize the depth at which you are stuck. There’s nothing worse than those deep stucks that approach China depth, which can take forever to get out of. 
  • Makes every effort to help those who are stuck. You may not be the strongest muscle out there, but you do have muscles. Help out in any way you can. We may not be powerhouses for lifting up the back end, but we rock at swinging front ends around and ski pulling.
  • Keeps her dignity about her. Even though your skill may have improved to the point you are one of the stronger riders, smack talk is a complete turnoff. Keep humble and minimize the smack talk. Chiding and joking is one thing, but if you repel all the riders around you with your airs of superiority you’ll find yourself with no one to ride with, be it male or female.

Now I have to admit, being a braaaping girl on the hill is fun. I saw a group of riders poking at a hill in Golden, B.C., recently. Highmarking a hill one by one. I waited my turn, then blew up and over the hill to the next plateau, then the next one. Upon my return, the guys shook their heads in disbelief—that was a girl. I waited for my turn again. I didn’t go up to them and tell them how it should be done, but when one dude came over to talk I said, “Mash your throttle once you crest through the trees and hit it on the left side. You’ll fly right up.” Sure enough, bam, he hit it and made it. Men have a certain amount of pride when it comes to shredding. Do not appear to be “Little Miss Expert” as you will again offend and repel those around you. If they do ask, however, it’s fun to share technique. 

It take a special man to embrace us shredding women and special women to be shredders.  I wouldn’t have it any other way. I love a life of horsepower, spills and thrills and I am thankful my man accepts and encourages me along the way.

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